Switzerland is passionate about football

UBS is the main partner of the Swiss Football Association

A long-term partnership

UBS is the main partner of the Swiss Football Association (SFA), building on the long-term partnership that began with Credit Suisse in 1993. The bank is main partner for all junior and senior national teams in men's and women's football, the Beach Soccer national team, the eFootball national team and the promotion of young talent in Switzerland.

  • 0

    years

  • 0

    World Cup appearances (A-teams)

  • 0

    European Championship (A-teams)

  • 0

    annual children's football tournaments

Laying the foundations for future success through the promotion of young talent and creating the best possible conditions for long-term success continues to be a key goal, as it has been since the partnership began in 1993, demonstrated with half of the financial commitment being dedicated to promoting young talent.

Children's and grassroots football also remain an important part of the partnership, which continues to include the official Swiss schools football championship. And in line with UBS’s commitment to equally supporting athletes of all genders, both the women’s and men's teams will continue to receive equal premiums.

We're ready for the summer of football

The big tournament for the Swiss national team begins on 15 June with the match against Hungary. To mark the occasion, we are launching our national campaign entitled “A team is always everyone.”

Our support for the Swiss Football Association is an important pillar of our broad commitment within Switzerland – in the spirit of: “A team like Switzerland, a bank like Switzerland.”

Sissi, our Moo-racle

Moo-racle

How will the national team do?

Sissi is not an ordinary cow. No, Sissi is a football fan and she has a special gift: She can predict the outcome of Swiss national team matches. That's why we ask Sissi how she thinks the national team will fare before each match in the tournament – who does she think will win?

Profile of our moo-racle:
Name: Sissi
Age: 5
Place of residence: Schönenberg (ZH)
Breed: Original Braunvieh

Switzerland vs. Hungary

How will the national team do?

Prediction: Switzerland to win

Correct! Sissi got it right. Come by again to see the next prediction!

Scotland vs. Switzerland

How will the national team do?

Prediction: Switzerland to win

Just off the mark. Sissi was just too optimistic. She'll get it right next time! Come by again to see the next prediction!

Switzerland vs. Germany

How will the national team do?

She can predict the outcome of Swiss national team matches – what does Sissi predict?

A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 European Championships

    of National football team

Whenever an athlete or a squad brandishes a trophy or receives a medal, It's a safe bet that there's a whole team of people behind the scenes supporting them. These people do a good job out of the public eye – motivating, timekeeping, account keeping, maintaining order, and coordinating tickets. They carry out their tasks with the same pride and professionalism as the athletes in the spotlight who receive all the attention.

And then there are the fans – entire nations, clubs, parents, and kids on the sidelines, shouting, cheering, hoping for the best, crossing their fingers, and ramping up the excitement in the stadium. Everyone at the event is there with their heart and soul, making the sport a special and emotional experience because: A team is always everyone.

  • 0 digital recipes

    and approx. 200 cookbooks

His job starts weeks before the tournament begins. As the national team's top chef, he's responsible for putting together the menus, contacting the local food and beverage suppliers, and consulting the top chef at the team's hotel. One of his most important and fundamental tasks is to make sure that the food is of the required standard and to test as many ingredients as possible in advance. This ensures that each menu fulfills its respective purpose and helps the athletes to refuel and recover. A typical shopping list for ten days away comprises 70 kg of pasta, 20 kg of gnocchi, 20 kg of vegetables and 10 kg of sliced fruit per day.

The players affectionately call him "Nonno," "Boss," or "Grande," because they wouldn't be able to perform at the highest level without his commitment, his flair for flavors, and his enthusiasm! A team is always everyone.

  • 0 kg of laundry per year

    always washed at 40°C

His organizational skills are key to his job. As the equipment manager, he assembles the required equipment and must be prepared for everything, so he has a plan A, a plan B, and even a plan C. An away match involves around 2.5–3 tonnes of material. Before a match, he prepares the changing rooms. This means carefully laying out each player's outfit in their individual changing area, taking into account their specific wishes. He starts with the goalkeeper and then follows the line-up. Once the players are equipped and ready for the match, he puts the captain's armband on him and hands him the pennant as they walk out onto the pitch – that's the tradition. His work fills him with pride, and he will never forget occasions such as the team's victory over France in the European Championship round of 16 and the ensuing exhilaration. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 seconds leeway

    for the time of arrival at the stadium

He needs to be really punctual and to be able to deal with stress, because as a bus driver you never know what to expect in local traffic. His time window for arriving at the stadium is just +/– 2.5 minutes, and his passengers must be able to rest and relax during the bus journey. For this reason, he drives along the routes in advance by car, using a stopwatch to measure how long they take. In addition, he prepares an alternative route and discusses all eventualities with the local police, in line with the motto "Preparation is everything." The most important thing in a football team bus these days is electric sockets. It's also crucial that there are enough drinks on board for the players. Above all, the timekeeper has to radiate a sense of calm, even in hectic situations, and not get stressed. A team is always everyone.

  • 0 trumpets

    and 15 hats to match his outfit

He's surrounded by thousands of fans, yet you can tell that he's there. Because he sounds his trumpet expertly to fire up the spectators and cheer the Swiss team on. He likes to stand in the stadium sectors where things are a little quieter. He can play the trumpet "more safely" there, without being jostled by crowds. His music needs to be cleverly timed and carefully targeted, because the crowds only cheer at full throttle when Switzerland's attacking. Sometimes, the trumpeter has to take a break too, though, to avoid headaches.

In the past, the trumpet could sometimes be heard during the warm-up, at the special request of the then national coach. Because the motto applies also to warm-ups: A team is always everyone.

Participate and benefit

Pick-up Fan-Caps

Pick up a national team Fan-Cap in our UBS or Credit Suisse branches now. The caps are available from 3 June. (Offer while stocks last) 

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