Passing on your family wealth

Passing on your family wealth Now’s the time to decide about your estate

No one knows what the future will bring. When is the right time to talk frankly about inheritance and your estate?

Many people put off this important conversation because they’re unsure, or worried about creating conflict. Often, they wait until it’s too late to make a decision.

Passing on the wealth your family has built up over the years is a challenging task filled with emotion. Especially when your wealth is tied up in various, complex assets. There are several things to keep in mind to avoid creating resentment or disputes.

Did you know that:

  • Despite inheritance rules, you still have some freedom to decide who inherits what?
  • You and your spouse cannot draw up a joint will?
  • Partners do not automatically inherit everything after the death of a spouse?

Find out how best to protect yourself, your heirs, and your legacy.

We thought we had everything sorted out in the best possible way. Marriage contract, last will and testament, executor, even a power of attorney. But we’d never discussed this with our children. We were astonished to find out that they had completely different ideas and wishes. Especially when it came to our two properties and the art collection. Now we’ve worked out a solution that suits everyone.

Married couple from Aargau


Should all the children inherit the same amount?

Who’ll make the decisions when you’re no longer able to?

Do you speak openly to your family about your assets?

 

Should all the children inherit the same amount? And divide the family property in three? Because people in families don’t always agree.

Because people in families don’t always agree

When your assets include real estate, art objects, or collections, dividing them up becomes much more delicate. Take everyone’s point of view into consideration – sometimes your heirs have wishes you had no idea about.

We had a worthwhile discussion and cleared up all the important questions. As a family, we sometimes find it hard to talk frankly about inheritance. But thanks to the experts from UBS, we were able to find a fair solution. Even for the vacation home, which is very dear not only to us, but also to our stepsister.

Siblings from Zurich and Neuchâtel

Should all the children inherit the same amount?

Plan your estate today:

  • What would be a fair division?
  • How should assets such as real estate, collections, or personal valuables be divided up fairly?
  • How big a role should emotional attachment to certain assets play?
  • What do you need to keep in mind if you want to pass on part of your wealth while you’re still alive?
  • How can you provide financial security for your spouse or partner?

Our process

First we’ll assess your personal circumstances and needs. As well as the wishes and needs of your heirs. If this applies to you, our experts will draw up the necessary documents and ensure the succession plan is correct in form and content.

This could involve:

  • Drawing up or revising your marriage contract, inheritance agreement, or will
  • Reassessing your real estate
  • Deciding how your real estate should be divided 
  • Using an executor mandate to organize the administration of your estate

Talk to each other

And talk to us. We can find the answer together.

 

Who’ll make the decisions when you’re no longer able to? The authorities? Keep important decisions about assets in the family.

Keep important decisions about assets in the family

Many people are unaware that if you haven’t already set up a power of attorney and you lose mental capacity, the Administration for Children and Families will appoint a guardian. And even between married couples, the right to represent the other is not unlimited. This means that your spouse/partner will no longer be able to freely access your joint assets.

Who’ll make the decisions when you’re no longer able to?

With a power of attorney, you specify who will take decisions for you if you lose mental capacity:

  • Is there someone you trust who shares your values – including when it comes to your assets?
  • If you want to give a power of attorney to several people, how do you decide who is responsible for what?
  • What do these people need to know before taking on this role?

Our process

First we’ll assess your personal circumstances and needs. Then you’ll tell us who should have power of attorney in the event that you lose mental capacity. Depending on the case, we look at which representation rights and functions the advance care directive should encompass.
You, your spouse or partner, and your heirs can rely on ongoing, confidential support from your client advisor.

This could involve:

  • Drawing up a power of attorney for both spouses or partners
  • Naming each other, as well as a child or someone else you trust as a secondary person with power of attorney
  • Information about filing at your competent regional office

Talk to each other

And talk to us. We can find the answer together.

 

Do you speak openly to your family about your assets? And about passing these on to your heirs? So that your family values can continue into the future.

So that your family values can continue into the future

Your assets are carefully structured and you have chosen a suitable investment strategy. What happens once your heirs take over? Do they also have experience with managing assets? Securing wealth over generations is a major challenge for many families.

Do you speak openly to your family about your assets?

Plan the handing on of your assets in good time:

  • What’s important to you when it comes to managing wealth?
  • How do you want to pass on your knowledge about managing your family’s wealth to the next generation?
  • How will you structure your family assets for handing on to your heir?
  • What’s a sensible way for your heirs to manage your real estate portfolio?
  • What should you watch out for with investments in order to avoid making losses?
  • How can the next generation get involved in managing the family assets at an early stage?

Our process

First we’ll assess your personal circumstances and needs. As well as the wishes and needs of your heirs. As required, we consult our experienced specialists and plan with them how your transfer could be implemented.

You, your spouse or partner, and your heirs can rely on ongoing, confidential support from your client advisor.

This could involve:

  • Joint discussions on your asset situation and investment strategy
  • Preparing a gift or advance inheritance, if you request this
  • Getting the next generation involved in managing assets to secure your family wealth for the future

Talk to each other

And talk to us. We can find the answer together.