Multi-sector Where is traffic congestion in China rising and falling?

In addition to relative congestion data from TomTom, UBS Evidence Lab now offers congestion data from AMAP, a popular Chinese navigation app, showing how much longer a journey takes relative to a time when traffic is flowing freely.

19 Jun 2020
  • Amid reports of new COVID-19 cases in Beijing and nearby Tianjin, both relative congestion (TomTom) and congestion (AMAP) have fallen sharply in the past week.
  • Both measures have risen in Nanjing and Shenzhen.
  • Congestion in Beijing has declined sharply. In Mainland China overall, it has fallen slightly in the last few weeks.
  • Congestion in Guangzhou fell sharply after floods in mid-May.
  • In Changchun, which experienced an outbreak in late May, congestion has been rising.
  • In terms of rush hour congestion, the cities with the greatest increase in the past week are Nanjing and Yangzhou.
  • Beijing and Tianjin are among the cities with the largest decrease.

Relative Congestion (TomTom) vs. Congestion (AMAP) in Major Chinese Cities (W/WChange as of 16-Jun-20)

Source: UBS Evidence Lab, TomTom, AMAP

Congestion in Beijing vs. Mainland China

Source: UBS Evidence Lab, AMAP

Congestion in Major Chinese Cities

Source: UBS Evidence Lab, AMAP

Peak Congestion* Change Week-on-Week: Top 10/Bottom 10 Cities (as of 16-Jun-20)

Source: UBS Evidence Lab, AMAP